• Jaundice and Your Newborn

    Congratulations on the birth of your new baby!

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  • Learning Disabilities: What Parents Need to Know

    Your child will learn many things in life—how to listen, speak, read, write, and do math. Some skills may be harder to learn than others. If your child is trying his best to learn certain skills but is not able to keep up with his peers, it’s important to find out why. Your child may have a learning

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  • Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child

    If your child has asthma or allergic rhinitis (hay fever), your pediatrician may prescribe a corticosteroid, also commonly referred to as a steroid. These medicines are the best available to decrease the swelling and irritation (inflammation) that occurs with persistent asthma or allergy. They are not

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  • Internet and Your Family, The

    The Internet can connect you and your family to all types of resources. At your computer, you and your family can read the latest news, look up information, listen to music, play games, buy things, or e-mail friends. The possibilities for learning and exploring on the Internet are endless. However, not

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  • Home Safety Checklist

    Is your house a safe place for your child to live and play? The following safety checklist can help you prevent serious injuries or even death. Though it addresses common safety concerns, it's important to remember that every house is different and no checklist is complete. Because there may be other

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  • How to Take Your Child's Temperature

    Your temperature (TEM-pruh-chur) is how warm or cold your body is. Normal temperature for a child is 98°F to 99°F or 37°C. The small circle (°) means “degrees.” Anything over 100.4°F or 38°C is a fever. (See “Words to Know” for “F” and “C.”)

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  • HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine Gardasil®-9 (VIS)

    HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with many cancers.

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  • Important Information for Teens Who Get Headaches

    A lot of teens do. In fact, 50% to 75% of all teens report having at least one headache per month!

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  • Influenza (Live, Intranasal) Vaccine (VIS)

    Influenza (“flu”) is a contagious disease that spreads around the United States every year, usually between October and May.

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  • Immunizations: What You Need To Know

    Immunizations have helped children stay healthy for more than 50 years. They are safe and they work. In fact, serious side effects are no more common than those from other types of medication. Vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%! Yet many

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  • Healthy Communication With Your Child

    Healthy communication with your child is one of the most important and rewarding skills that you can develop as a parent. It also makes the tough parts of parenting (such as disciplining your child) much easier and more effective. Good communication

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  • Help Stop Teenage Suicide
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  • How to Prevent Tooth Decay in Your Baby

    Baby teeth are important. If baby teeth are lost too early, the teeth that are left may move and not leave any room for adult teeth to come in. Also, if tooth decay is not prevented, it can be costly to treat, cause pain, and lead to life-threatening infections.

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  • Hepatitis C

    About 4 million Americans are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and many do not even know it. Anyone can get infected with HCV, including children.

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  • Imaging Tests: A Look Inside Your Child's Body

    If your pediatrician isn't sure what the cause of your child's illness or injury is, imaging tests may be needed. Imaging tests are used to “look” inside the body. They can help diagnose injuries and illnesses from broken bones to cancer. Some tests can even find problems before symptoms appear.

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  • Hip Dysplasia (Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip)

    In resistant cases or in older children, hip dysplasia may need to be treated with a combination of braces, casts, traction, or surgery. Your child will be admitted to the hospital if surgery is necessary. After surgery, your child will be placed

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Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Walpole Pediatric Associates

Monday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

9:00 am-12:00 pm