• ASDs Family Handout—Medications and Your Child

    Medications are not the primary treatment for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Medications have not been shown to directly improve language or social skills. However, medications may help with behaviors that get in the way of progress in your child's intervention program. Such behaviors include

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  • ASDs Family Handout—The Medical Home for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Parents, pediatricians, and other health care professionals are encouraged to work together so that all of the medical and nonmedical needs of children and youth are met. This partnership is at the core of what the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) calls the medical home. Medical home is an approach

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  • Basketball and Volleyball (Care of the Young Athlete)

    Acute and overuse injuries are common in jumping sports like basketball and volleyball. Acute injuries include bruises (contusions); cuts and scrapes (lacerations); ankle, knee, or finger sprains or fractures; shoulder dislocations; eye injuries;

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  • Baby Walkers: What You Need to Know

    Most walker injuries happen while adults are watching. Parents or caregivers simply cannot respond quickly enough. A child in a walker can move more than 3 feet in 1 second! That is why walkers are never safe to use, even with an adult close by.

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Intervention Approaches Used for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    As soon as the diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is made, your child should be referred for intervention services. While speech and occupational therapy are important, the social and communication differences of a child with an ASD need a therapy team. That team should use special intervention

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Sleep Problems

    Sleep problems are common in children with and without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One-third to half of children with ASDs have sleep problems. This can lead to daytime problems with paying attention, being irritable, and displaying more repetitive behaviors. The amount of nighttime sleep needed

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Emergency Information Form For Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)

    Family handout from Autism: Caring for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Resource Toolkit for Clinicians, 2nd Edition, developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Children With Disabilities Autism Subcommittee (ASC).

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Complementary medicine refers to practices that are used in addition to the educational, behavioral, and medical interventions recommended by your child's pediatrician and schools.

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Talking About Sexuality for Parents of Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    All children and youth, including those with developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), have questions about physical changes in their bodies and emotions and feelings they experience during puberty and as they grow up. It is important to help children and youth understand these

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  • Asthma

    Asthma (AZZ-muh) is a disease of the breathing tubes that carry air to the lungs. The linings of the tubes swell, and they fill up with mucus (MYOO-kus). This is called inflammation (in-fluh-MAY-shun). It makes the tubes get narrow. This makes it hard to breathe.

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Inclusion: Middle and High School

    Inclusion describes an approach toward education that allows children who require additional educational services to receive those supports in regular classrooms with typically developing peers. The goal of inclusion is for all children and youth with disabilities to attend school in the least restrictive

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Sibling Issues

    Most brothers and sisters of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) cope well. However, they still have challenges in learning how to deal with a sibling with an ASD. This handout can help you teach your children how to meet these challenges.

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Wandering Off (Elopement)

    This is the tendency for an individual to try to leave the safety of a responsible person's care or a safe area, which can result in potential harm or injury. This might include running off from adults at school or in the community, leaving the classroom without permission, or leaving the house when

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Behavioral Challenges

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may have a hard time relating to and communicating with other people. They may attempt to communicate through their behaviors. For example, children with ASDs may have a hard time telling their parents that they do not want to do an activity that is requested

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Inclusion: Elementary School

    Inclusion describes an approach toward education that allows children who require additional educational services to receive those supports in regular classrooms with typically developing peers. The goal of inclusion is for all children with disabilities to attend school in the least restrictive environment

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  • ASDs Family Handout—Seizures and Epilepsy

    Seizures are caused by sudden excessive electrical activity in the brain. A child who has a seizure may lose consciousness (black out) for a short time; shake strongly all over his body; have unusual, repeated body movements; or stare blankly into space.

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Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Walpole Pediatric Associates

Monday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

9:00 am-12:00 pm