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  • Diarrhea, Vomiting, and Water Loss (Dehydration)

    Diarrhea (loose poop) and vomiting, or “throwing up,” are why many parents call the doctor. Your child's doctor may call this gastroenteritis (GAS- troh-en-tur-EYE-tis). These symptoms are often caused by a virus*.

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  • Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

    Eczema is a chronic skin problem that causes dry, red, itchy skin. It is also called atopic dermatitis or AD. Anyone can get eczema, but it is most common in babies to young adults.

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  • Fever

    Fever is a sign that your child is fighting an infection. It is usually harmless. Your child's fever should go away in about 3 days. If it doesn’t, call your child's doctor.

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  • Colds

    Most children get 8 to 10 colds before they are 2 years old. Most colds come and go without any big problems.

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  • Ear Infections

    Ear infections (in-FEK-shuns) in children are common. Most kids get at least one ear infection by the time they are 3 years old. Most ear infections clear up without any lasting problems. Your child's doctor may also call an ear infection otitis (oh-TYE-tis) media.

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  • Crying and Your Baby: How to Calm a Fussy or Colicky Baby

    Babies cry for different reasons. Crying is one way babies try to tell us what they need. They may be hungry, have a soiled diaper, or just want a little attention. (See checklist at the bottom.) If a crying baby cannot be comforted, the cause may be colic. Read on about colic and ways to calm a crying

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  • Diaper Rash

    Most babies get diaper rash, but it is usually not serious. Read on to find out more about what causes diaper rash and how to treat it.

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  • Chickenpox Vaccine, The

    (Please see the related Vaccine Information Statement, The Chickenpox Vaccine: What You Need to Know)

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  • Croup: When Your Child Needs Hospital Care

    Croup is a common illness that affects the airways, making it hard for a child to breathe. It's most common in toddlers but can affect children between 6 months and 12 years of age. Another symptom is a loud barking cough that is worse at night. Trouble breathing and the barking cough can be scary for

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  • Chickenpox Vaccine, The: What You Need to Know (VIS)

    Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in young infants and adults.

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  • Croup and Your Young Child

    Croup is a common illness in young children. It can be scary for parents as well as children. Read on for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about croup, including types, causes, symptoms, and treatments.

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  • Common Childhood Infections

    Most infections are caused by germs called viruses and bacteria. While you may be able to keep germs from spreading, you can't always keep your child from getting sick. It is important for parents to know how to keep their children healthy and what to do when they get sick. Read on to learn more from

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  • Constipation and Your Child

    Bowel patterns vary from child to child just as they do in adults. What's normal for your child may be different from what's normal for another child. Most children have bowel movements 1 or 2 times a day. Other children may go 2 to 3 days or longer before passing a normal stool.

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  • Bronchiolitis and Your Young Child

    Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory illness among infants. One of its symptoms is trouble breathing, which can be scary for parents and young children. Read on for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about bronchiolitis, causes, signs and symptoms, how to treat it, and how to prevent

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  • Bedwetting

    Most children learn to use the toilet between 2 and 4 years of age. Even after children are toilet-trained, they may wet the bed until they are older. It's even common for 6-year-olds to wet the bed once in a while. Some children still wet the bed at age 12.

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  • Asthma and Your Child

    This publication was written by the American Academy of Pediatrics to inform parents about asthma. It includes information about asthma symptoms, triggers, treatments, medicines, and how to communicate with your child's school.

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Walpole Pediatric Associates

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