Posts for: March, 2018

By Walpole Pediatric Associates
March 30, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
The harder your children play, the harder they might fall. During childhood, fractures and broken bones are common for children playing or participating in sports. While falls are a common part of childhood,
Detecting a Broken Bone your pediatrician in shares important information to help you understand if your child has a broken bone. 
 
If your child breaks a bone, the classic signs might include swelling and deformity. However, if a break isn’t displaced, it may be harder to tell if the bone is broken or fractured. Some telltale signs that a bone is broken are:
  • You or your child hears a snap or grinding noise as the injury occurs
  • Your child experiences swelling, bruising or tenderness to the injured area
  • It is painful for your child to move it, touch it or press on it
  • The injured part looks deformed

What Happens Next?

If you suspect that your child has a broken bone, it is important that you seek medical care immediately. All breaks, whether mild or severe, require medical assistance. Keep in mind these quick first aid tips:
  • Call 911 - If your child has an 'open break' where the bone has punctured the skin, if they are unresponsive, if there is bleeding or if there have been any injuries to the spine, neck or head, call 911. Remember, better safe than sorry! If you do call 911, do not let the child eat or drink anything, as surgery may be required.
  • Stop the Bleeding - Use a sterile bandage or cloth and compression to stop or slow any bleeding.
  • Apply Ice - Particularly if the broken bone has remained under the skin, treat the swelling and pain with ice wrapped in a towel. As usual, remember to never place ice directly on the skin.
  • Don't Move the Bone - It may be tempting to try to set the bone yourself to put your child out of pain, particularly if the bone has broken through the skin, do not do this! You risk injuring your child further. Leave the bone in the position it is in.
Contact your pediatrician to learn more about broken bones, and how you can better understand the signs and symptoms so your child can receive the care they need right away. 

By Walpole Pediatric Associates
March 16, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Ear Pain   Ear Infections  
When your child experiences ear pain, it can take a toll on their irritability and daily activities. Understanding your child’s ear pain is key in determining the treatment needed to relieve their pain. Ear pain is
Ear Infection never fun and it can really stop your child in their tracks, which is why it is important to visit your pediatrician for proper diagnosis and care. 
 
According to your pediatrician, the most common cause of ear pain in children (and adults, too) is blocked Eustachian tubes. When functioning normally, the Eustachian tubes keep the air pressure even on both sides of the eardrum. This ear pain is typically worse at night because the tubes cannot drain naturally when you are lying down.
 
Other causes of ear pain include:
  • Acute infections of the middle ear
  • Enlarged adenoids
  • Bacterial, fungal or viral infection in the external part of the ear
Your child can also develop swimmer’s ear, even if they are not a swimmer. This infection occurs when water gets in the ear, most often while showering, and it can’t be expelled. This then leads to ear pain and transient deafness, but by visiting your pediatrician, your child can receive proper treatment. 
 
If your child experiences ear pain, contact your pediatrician for more information on ear pain and how to help your child. 

By Walpole Pediatric Associates
March 06, 2018
Category: Safety
When you are not able to watch your child closely, many moms or dads will place their child in a playpen. While you might think this is a safe place for your child, think again. A playpen can also pose risks
playpen safety for your child and be dangerous under certain circumstances. With the guidance of your pediatrician, lets take a look at ways you can prevent mishaps from occurring with your child while they are in a playpen. According to your pediatrician, make sure that:
  • Netting has a small weave without any tears.
  • The drop side is up and securely locked.
  • The rails and padding are in good condition.
  • Toys are not strung from the playpen
  • You don’t use an accordion-style fence as a play yard.
Playpens are popular because they allow parents to put their baby down with the knowledge that their little one can’t wander off. By understanding how to protect your baby, playpens can remain a safe place. Your pediatrician offers helpful tips to help keep your baby safe at all times. 



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Walpole Pediatric Associates

(508) 668-2200
1350 Main Street Walpole, MA 02081