Posts for: December, 2017

By Walpole Pediatric Associates
December 15, 2017
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Baby Care   Infants   Colic  
All babies cry, it is their way of telling you that they’re hungry, wet, or tired. However, if your baby has colic, they may cry all the time. So how can you tell the difference between your baby’s normal tears and colic? 
 
Colic is a term used to describe uncontrollable crying in an otherwise healthy baby. If your baby is younger than 5 months old and cries for more than three hours in a row on three or more days a week for at least three weeks, chances are they are colicky. Colic is not a disease and won’t cause your baby any long-term harm, but it is tough to go through for both babies and their parents. By visiting your pediatrician, you can determine the best way to handle your colicky baby. 

Your Pediatrician Shares the Symptoms

When a baby is around two or three weeks old, colic most often shows up at this time. While babies normally cry to let you know when they are wet, hungry, frightened or tired, a baby with colic cries inconsolably and excessively—often at the same time of day. This can frequently occur in the late afternoon or evening.
 
If your baby has colic, their belly may also look enlarged. You may also notice that they alternately extend or pull up their legs and passes gas as they cry.  
 
Other symptoms of a baby that is otherwise healthy and well-fed include:
  • Predictable crying episodes. 
  • Intense or inconsolable crying. 
  • Posture changes. 

When to Visit Your Pediatrician

It is important to seek immediate medical attention if your baby’s crying could be the result of a fall or injury. Please call our pediatrician if you baby stops gaining weight or begins to lose weight.  Also, please call our office if your baby:
  • Can’t be soothed, even for a few minutes
  • Doesn’t suck strongly at the bottle or breast
  • Doesn’t like to be held or touched
  • Has an unusual-sounding cry, or sounds like they are in pain
  • Has diarrhea or blood in the stool
  • Has trouble breathing
  • Is less alert or sleepier than usual
  • Is eating less than usual
  • Is running a fever of 100.4 degrees or more
  • Is throwing up
We understand that a colicky baby can take a lot out of your day, but, as your pediatrician, we are available to help you better care for your colicky baby.  

By Walpole Pediatric Associates
December 04, 2017
Tags: Bottle   Sippy Cup   Weaning  
Making the switch from bottle to sippy cup may seem like a lost cause, but with tips from your pediatrician, you can easily transition your child. If you are ready to wean your baby to a cup, here are
some tips to make the transition easier:

Start Early. Try to introduce a sippy cup at 6 months to get your child acquainted with it before it is necessary for them to give up the bottle. Children than are older than a year often have a much more difficult time with this transition because the bottle becomes a source of comfort and security. 

Introduce a sippy cup in a fun way. Show your child how to drink from the cup and encourage them to imitate you. Start by filling the cup with a little water and celebrate each successive approximation toward the end goal of drinking from the cup.  
 
Try different cups. Sippy cups come in all different sizes, shapes and colors. The spouts can also vary in texture and size, and some children will respond better to one type of cup over another. Choose a sippy cup with your child’s favorite character or animal on it to grab your child’s attention. 
 
Eliminate bottle feedings gradually. Reduce bottle feedings systematically. Each week, remove one bottle feeding and offer a sippy cup instead. Your pediatrician encourages you to start by eliminating the midday bottle first, then the morning bottle and finally the evening bottle. 
 
Remember, out of sight, out of mind. Your pediatrician encourages you to remove all bottles from your child’s view during the weaning process. Only take the bottle out when necessary. If your child requests a bottle anyway and you have already determined that a bottle should not be given at that time, offer the sippy cup and food instead. 
 
With help from your pediatrician, you can easily wean your child off of bottles.  



Contact Us

Walpole Pediatric Associates

(508) 668-2200
1350 Main Street Walpole, MA 02081